What I will celebrate on Easter morning 1

What I will celebrate on Easter morning 1

Through Holy week we will publish some thoughts on the celebration of Easter. We start with these words from Bishop Jack Spong, taken from his book, Examining the Meaning of the Resurrection.

The impact of Jesus' life on his followers was so intense it simply did not fade after his death.  They kept awaking to new dimensions of what he meant.  No act of human cruelty could destroy his life, no barriers could withstand his love. Jesus embraced the outcasts, whether lepers, Samaritans, Gentiles or the woman caught in adultery. His life could not be contained within the boundaries of religion  He allowed the touch of the woman with the chronic menstrual ftow; he proclaimed that all religious rules had no value, unless they enhanced human life.  His followers found in him a life that reflected the Source of Life, a love that reflected the Source of love and the being that reflected the Ground of Being and so they said "all that we mean by the word 'God' we have experienced in him."

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What I Would Ask the New Chief Exec of Canterbury

What I Would Ask the New Chief Exec of Canterbury

Justin Welby is the first Archbishop of Canterbury whose background includes being a chief executive in private industry. As one of his newly acquired junior employees, Sonya Brown, has prepared a few probing questions she would ask the boss, should she get invited to a 'team development day'.

Just before I was due to go to theological college I worked as a temporary call centre worker for an international insurance company. This organisations as far as I could see had the morality of a monkey nut and a staffing policy which was less about ‘caring for our staff at every level’ and more about wanting stones worth of flesh for every pound. The longer I worked there the more irritated and critical I became. 

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Was Honest to God ever likely to convince teenage atheists?

While he was re-reading Honest to God, published 50 years ago, Frank Godfrey noticed that the Methodist Recorder had reprinted in its '50 Years Ago' column, a letter about teenage atheism. It got him thinking..

As I read the archived letter, I was struck by the timing of its first appearance.  It was written in January 1963, just two months before Bishop John Robinson published Honest to God.  The writer was a teacher from the Midlands: 

 "I have charge of 54 sixth-formers in a co-educational grammar school.  I would have expected only a minority of these young men and women to have had definite Christian convictions and a majority to have had agnostic views although mellowed with some Christian sympathies.  Alas this is not so. 

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